Archive for the ‘learning environment’ Category

summer professional reading: THINQ Kindergarten (and Grades 4-6)

Posted on: July 28th, 2017 by jnovakowski No Comments

IMG_6380THINQ Kindergarten: Inquiry-based learning in the kindergarten classroom

by Joan Reimer and Deb Watters

THINQ series authors: Jennifer Watt and Jill Colyer

published by WAVE Learning Solutions, Canada, 2017

accompanying website: www.wavelearningsolutions.com

This is a relatively new series of books, written by Canadian (Ontario) authors. The Kindergarten book just came out this spring. One of the many things I like about this book is that it acknowledges that there are many interpretations of inquiry and not “one way” to engage in inquiry. There is a focus on remembering that being inquiry-minded is part of being human and that we are born with curiosity. I also like the recognition of the importance of the learning environment and the emphasis on developing inquiry dispositions. The “Inquiry in Action” sections share learning stories or case studies from classrooms. As I read the book, I added lots of post-it notes to pages to go back to, particularly connections I was making to our BC competencies – both core and curricular.

There are seven chapters:

1) Inquiry-based learning in kindergarten

2) Wondering and questioning

3) Creating an inquiry environment

4) Negotiating the curriculum

5) Documentation

6) Inquiry assessment in kindergarten

7) Final thoughts

IMG_6381The layout for each chapter is very similar. There is lots of “white space” and use of text boxes and colourful visuals to support the content of the chapter. Each section has a big idea and often quotes from well-known educators and authors.

 

 

 

 

IMG_6382At the end of each chapter there is a chapter summary with some questions to provoke reflective thinking. There are also “thumbnails” of the blackline masters/printables that accompany each chapter and can be found at the back of the book.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_6383The printable resources at the back of the book correspond to each chapter and focus on the big ideas from the chapter as well as templates for educators to use for planning and assessment.

 

 

 

 

The Grades 4-6 book was release last year and is very similar in format to the Kindergarten book. Interestingly, in this book, the assessment chapter is up front and then assessment ideas are woven throughout the rest of the book. I wonder if that is because this is a pressing issue for intermediate teachers – how to assess student learning during the process of inquiry? I know this question comes up a lot in my work with teachers. There is also much more of an emphasis on questions of personal significance, inquiry approaches across disciplines and the importance of providing feedback (often through questioning_ during the inquiry process in the Grades 4-6 or Junior book. The printable resources focus more on student self-assessment templates than the Kindergarten book.

The Grades 1-3 book and the Grades 7-9 book are supposed to be released this summer or fall.

~Janice

summer professional reading: Redesigning Learning Spaces

Posted on: July 17th, 2017 by jnovakowski No Comments

IMG_6202Redesigning Learning Spaces by Robert Dillon, Ben Gilpin, A.J. Juliani and Erin Klein, published in 2016 by Corwin.

 

This volume is part of the Corwin Connected Educators Series.

 

 

This short book has five chapters:

Leading Change Through Classroom Learning-Space Design

This chapter focused on listening to students about what works for them. It also cites the much referenced research study looking at how environmental print and stimulus in the classroom affects student learning. I appreciated the emphasis on creating “truly beautiful places to learn” and how we shouldn’t underestimate the importance of the aesthetic element. The authors discuss the intentional design of learning spaces to focus on exploration and student centred experiences and how this type of design gives the message to students that “I respect you as learners.”

Learning-Space Change as a Lever to Shift School Culture

The overall message of this book is emphasized in this chapter: Learning spaces matter and they impact the entire teaching and learning community. The authors cite a 2012 study that indicates that classroom environment can affect a child’s academic achievement by up to 25%.

Shaping Learning-Space Change for the Community

“Redesigning spaces to maximize learning is primarily a shift in culture and mindset.” The authors share examples of how small changes in schools can have impacts on systems and whole school design can shift the school culture and that of the greater community.

Learning Space as a Lever for Systemic Change

This chapter looks more broadly at systemic change but begins with the metaphor for the classroom of  ”habitat” and how a supportive habitat helps students’ learning power to be magnified. The importance of technology and “connected classrooms” as part of a learning ecosystem is emphasized, but acknowledges that the learning environment or habitat of the classroom, seems to be supportive of this.

Systemic change can begin with: 1) new options for lighting, seating, work spaces, ideation spaces, 2) looking for innovative partnerships outside of the school with industry and in community, 3) a “laser” focus on meaningful learning as opposed to what the authors call Pinterest-based learning and 4) with seeing all spaces as potential places for learning such as hallways as ideation spaces. These changes in classrooms spread in schools and then in districts.

Models of Excellence and a Place to Start

The final chapter shares some specific examples and challenges educators to be agents of change.

I appreciated this book as a short and succinct read that I will draw upon when advocating for changes to learning environments in our classrooms and schools. The authors have curated educational and design research that supports shifts in classroom and school learning spaces.

~Janice